Uk News i morning briefing: Everything you need to know about today's rail strikes   United Kingdom news

PremierLeague-News.Com - What’s being disrupted, and why, and how long it’s all going to last

Uk News i morning briefing: Everything you need to know about today's rail strikes   United Kingdom news

PremierLeague-News.Com - What’s being disrupted, and why, and how long it’s all going to last

Uk News  i morning briefing: Everything you need to know about today's rail strikes   United Kingdom news
21 June 2022 - 05:30

PremierLeague-News.Com - Breaking Sport Transfer News ! Welcome to Tuesday’s Early Edition from i.The biggest rail strikes in 30 years start today, as around 50,000 members of the RMT union walk out across more than a dozen train operators around the UK and London Underground. Whichever side of the picket line you’re on, today there are no winners, as commuters and school kids face disruption, businesses brace for another hit, and talks between unions, rail bosses and the government fail to bring a resolution. We’ll explain what’s being disrupted, and why, and how long it’s all going to last, after the news. Today’s news, and why it mattersDowning Street has asked ministers to ease restrictions on City bosses’ pay in a bid to show overseas companies the “benefits of Brexit”, the i has revealed. Steve Barclay, the PM’s chief of staff, wrote to Chancellor Rishi Sunak with a plan for “deregulatory measures to reduce the overall burden on business” and attract more firms to the UK. But with the cost of living crisis and a squeeze on earnings hitting millions of ordinary workers, it seems unlikely the proposal would go down well with the public. Covid infections have soared by 65 per cent this month as experts warn the UK is ‘massively vulnerable’ and the public should keep their ‘guard up’. It comes as the number of patients in English hospitals with Covid-19 has increased 24 per cent in a week. Both rises are being driven by the new Omicron subvariants BA.4 and BA.5. An internal campaign email leaked to i has revealed the Conservatives are struggling to get posters to sites across the Tiverton and Honiton constituency in time for polling day. The campaign has made a last-gasp appeal to Tory activists to help “get our voters to the polls” as they fight to avoid a stunning by-election defeat to the Liberal Democrats. Internal polling by the Lib Dems shows the party neck and neck with the Conservatives. Boris Johnson had a “minor routine operation related to his sinuses” at a London hospital, No 10 has said. The Prime Minister had the operation at 06:00 BST on Monday and was back in Downing Street at 10:00, a Downing St spokesman said. The PM’s spokesperson wouldn’t be drawn on questions about how long he had experienced problems with his sinuses nor if he had skipped waiting lists.A new Covid vaccine which protects against Omicron variant could be in the UK by autumn. Ministers hope that the next generation of jabs made both by Pfizer and Moderna will be ready by later this year, when a new round of vaccines will be administered to groups including over-65s, vulnerable people and frontline healthworkers. Five things you need to know about today’s action:Which services are going to be affected? Thirteen operators on the national network will be affected, with fewer than one in five trains runnings. Some areas, such as including most of Scotland and Wales, the whole of Cornwall and Dorset, and places such as Chester, Hull, Lincoln and Worcester, will have no passenger trains for the entire day. The full list of affected services is here. There will also be a 24-hour strike on the London Underground on Tuesday 21 June. Details on timings, lines and more can be found here.  What is the dispute over? In short: pay, working conditions, and job cuts due to changing technology. The RMT union says Network Rail and train operating companies have “subjected their staff to multi-year pay freezes” and are planning to cut thousands of jobs which will make railways less safe. The union is asking for a pay rise of at least 7% to offset the rising cost of living. It says employers offered a maximum of 3% – on condition they also accept job cuts and changes to working practices, which it rejects.. “We have a cost of living crisis, and it is unacceptable for railway workers to either lose their jobs or face another year of a pay freeze when inflation is at 11.1pc and rising,” RMT general secretary Mick Lynch said. The London Underground strike is part of a separate dispute about pensions and job losses. Is the government going to do anything? Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has said it is up to the unions and employers to negotiate pay and conditions, and Boris Johnson is expected to argue on Tuesday that unions are “harming the very people they claim to be helping”. The PM is reportedly planning to break the industrial action by allowing firms to bring in agency staff. But unions have warned this would be a step “even Margaret Thatcher did not go near” and could potentially break international law. Mr Johnson is expected to say today that “now is the time to come to a sensible compromise for the good of the British people and the rail workforce.” How long could it go on? The RMT’s Mick Lynch has said the campaign will “run as long as it needs to run until we get a settlement acceptable to our people.

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. He also accused Network Rail of escalating the dispute during Monday’s talks. “They have issued me a letter saying that there are going to be redundancies starting from July 1,” he told BBC’s Newsnight. “So rather than trying to come to an agreement in this dispute, they’ve escalated it by giving us formal notice of redundancy amongst our Network Rail members.” What happens now? It is hard to predict an end to the current stalemate, particularly with the current backdrop of the cost of living crisis. Asked on BBC Radio 4’s Today if public sector workers should not expect a pay rise in line with inflation, the Chief Treasury Secretary Simon Clarke replied: “Correct.” But the government faces some tricky decisions. As some point out, low pay awards will exacerbate recruitment problems in the public sector, but higher pay could also push inflation. However others suggest not increasing pay could trap the country in a “low-wage, low-growth spiral”. All eyes will be on what the PM says today, and the inevitable reaction from unions and the rail industry.  Commuters arrive at Waterloo station during the morning rush hour ahead of a major disruption to the transport system. (Photo: Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)Around the worldState-backed media in Russia has adjusted its narrative to mirror the new reality in Ukraine, and it is actually visible in data analysis. “Now the main theme is Russia is not at war with Ukraine, but the entire West,” one expert says. Hollywood star Ben Stiller has told Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky “you are my hero” at a meeting in Kyiv. Stiller, who is a a UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) goodwill ambassador, has been meeting refugees in Poland and Ukraine since last week. A newly elected politician in France is reportedly the first cleaner to become a member of parliament in the country. Rachel Keke, whose victory has been described by some as a “victory of the voiceless,” was previously a hotel chambermaid. A famous floating restaurant in Hong Kong has sunk in the South China Sea, just days after it was towed from the harbour where it operated for nearly 50 years. More than three million guests are believed to have eaten at the Jumbo restaurant, and it had featured in several films. Taking a wee in the sea could cost swimmers in a Spanish city £645 after authorities brought in new legislation. The new law bans “physiological evacuation on the beach or in the sea”, though details of exactly how the new rule will be policed have not been made available. Watch out for…more fallout from the rail strikes. Along with people missing exams, hospital appointments and more, Cabinet ministers are also expected to discuss the industrial action and the tough economic climate facing the country. Thoughts for the dayThe ‘pulled’ Carrie Johnson story raises questions we simply cannot ignore: A story alleging the PM wanted to give his now wife a £100,000-plus job as his chief of staff when he was foreign secretary has ‘disappeared’. This sets a dangerous precedent, argues Simon Kelner. NHS strikes are unprecedented, but this year they have the potential to unite the UK against the Government, says Dr Christopher Massey. Boris Johnson’s plan to boost City bosses’ pay contrasts with demands for ‘wage restraint’ for everyone else, writes Paul Waugh. Tory MPs say confusion over “high pay” Britain reflects wider incoherence on Government’s economic plan – or lack of one.Simon Kelner: ‘Now we all know about these tawdry claims, which, in truth, had been in the ether for a while (Michael Ashcroft included it in his biography of Carrie Johnson earlier this year)’ (Photo: AFP)Culture BreakThe messiest, muddiest time of year is almost upon us. After three years away, Glasto is back: here’s our guide to the hotly-anticipated headliners, the painful clashes, and the hidden gems of this year’s festival.This year’s Glastonbury headliners, from left: Billie Eilish, Paul McCartney and Kendrick Lamar (Photos: Samir Hussein/Getty for Live Nation UK; Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty; Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty)The Big ReadI was the first black Met Police officer, and was spat on by my colleagues and sent death threats, Norwell Roberts reveals in a heart-wrenching extract from his book. I’d never thought being London’s first black police officer was going to be easy, but nothing had prepared me for the difficulties that lay ahead, he writes. PC Norwell Gumbs (later Norwell Roberts) beginning his training with colleagues at Hendon Police College (Photo: Keystone-France/Gamma-Rapho/Getty)SportThe Magpies are being frustrated by rivals imposing a ‘Newcastle tax’ as club sources insist the club do not want to spend more than £100m this summer, writes Mark DouglasEkitike, Botman and Calvert-Lewin could be on their way to St James’ Park (Photo: Getty)Something to brighten your dayHusam, Oleksandra and their three young children fled Ukraine at the start of the war with only two handbags. Now, they are starting a new life in Wavertree. This is how a Liverpool community rebuilt the lives of a Ukrainian family in a month. ‘We’re safe now’, they say.Husam, second left, with the Chambers family, who have taken he and his young family in under the Homes for Ukraine scheme. (Photo: Phoebe Fleming)

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