London news 'My ADHD left me feeling suicidal - now I'm a UN speaker at 19' Uk news

PremierLeague-News.Com - School was a tough time for J Grange. Now, with the diagnosis and support he needed, he is thriving, and helping others to find their path

London news 'My ADHD left me feeling suicidal - now I'm a UN speaker at 19' Uk news

PremierLeague-News.Com - School was a tough time for J Grange. Now, with the diagnosis and support he needed, he is thriving, and helping others to find their path

London news  'My ADHD left me feeling suicidal - now I'm a UN speaker at 19' Uk news
13 May 2021 - 13:46

PremierLeague-News.Com - Breaking Sport Transfer News ! Get FREE email updates for East LondonInvalid EmailSomething went wrong, please try again later.I'M IN!When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Your information will be used in accordance with ourPrivacy Notice.Thank you for subscribingWe have more newslettersShow meSee ourprivacy noticeConstant exclusions, feeling misunderstood and getting in trouble. This was how J Grange went through school. He didn't know it at the time, but he actually had ADHD that was left undiagnosed for years, causing teachers to pass him off as a naughty child. One teacher even uttered the devastating words to J that he'd one day end up in prison. He found it hard to accept himself, which led him down a dark path that even left him contemplating suicide. “I was suicidal, depressed, feeling frustrated and misunderstood,” said J. “It took me years to get diagnosed - until the end of my school time. You can imagine the troubles I had at that time.” J found school a particularly challenging place, leading to his mental health drastically deteriorating (Image: Supplied by J Grange) Fast forward to 2021, and Walthamstow born J is now a 19-year-old United Nations speaker, national award nominated neurodiversity advocate and aspiring musician with a bright future ahead of him. He believes the support he received from The Prince’s Trust helped him to see how he could turn his neurodiversity into a positive, and break out of the dark place he had found himself in. He wants to share his story, to help others to find their light too. J did the enterprise course with the Prince’s Trust, where he met like minded people. Though he now wishes to pursue music and advocacy work rather than creating his own business, the opportunity meant he was able to learn in an environment free from judgement - a far cry from his school experience. 'I look at my ADHD as a superpower' J’s experience at school saw him constantly excluded from lessons and in trouble, something he feels many neurodiverse children experience. “Neurodiverse kids are constantly getting failed at school,” he said. “It did happen to me. But luckily my own strength and resilience helped me out of that. “Now I’m on a much better path. I’ve been helped and supported by the Prince’s Trust and I am an ambassador for the ADHD Foundation. “I spoke for the UN last week, speaking about neurodiversity in education - young people from countries all over the world attended. ” J’s advocacy work sees him speak with young people in schools and PRUs (pupil referral units), sharing his story, and advice advocating for improved education opportunities for children who find traditional education structures difficult. “I got diagnosed in 2017,” he continued. “So much has happened since then, it’s crazy. “That changed me, getting diagnosed. To a lot of people it’s one of those topics - should I or should I not have medication? “ Personally it helped me. It gave me a stable mind set, and made me finally understand who I then was. “When you get labelled positively as such, instead of the stereotyping of my school days - I look at it as a superpower.

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. He credits the Prince’s Trust in their commitment to helping everyone, no matter what age, race, religion or circumstance. “They’ve been so supportive of myself and others,” he said. “[With ADHD] there is constant stereotyping and being degraded - the view of “You’ve got ADHD you’re not going to amount to anything”. "Too many times you see ADHD or Autism and people think they’re below. It’s a superpower. It’s a great thing to have.” 30 per cent of business owners are neurodiverse. The road to seeing his neurodiversity as a superpower hasn’t always been easy, and reaching out for support has been crucial in J thriving. Get London's biggest stories straight in your inbox MyLondon’s brilliant new newsletter The 12 is packed with news, views, features and opinion from across the city. Every day we’ll send you a free email at around 12pm with 12 stories to keep you entertained, informed and uplifted. It’s the perfect lunchtime read. The MyLondon team tells London stories for Londoners. Our 45 journalists cover all the news you need - from City Hall to your local streets. Never miss a moment by signing up to The 12 newsletter here. "Throughout a couple of schools I went to, teachers would tell me I wasn’t going to amount to anything, and one said I’d end up in prison," he added. According to ADHD action, 30 per cent of adult prisoners are estimated to have the condition, while only 3-4 per cent of adults are believed to have the condition - many of whom are undiagnosed. For J, the crucial piece in beginning to correct the pattern of misunderstanding and negative school experiences those with ADHD experience is better understanding around the condition. “It all starts with training, things have got to change,” added J. "I’ve got a meeting with Vicky Ford (Minister for Children). It needs to be a collaborative effort between government and schools. “There needs to be neurodiverse role models going into schools and talking to the students. “We need a more tailored curriculum. Me being a musician - instead of writing an essay about Shakespeare, I could write a rap instead. A Youtube video about Maths. We’re in the 21st century and things are changing whether you like it or not. It’s too outdated. “Most parents would prefer their kids to be healthy and happy in school rather than get good grades. There’s too much of a focus on exams and grades.” Read More Related Articles

Source = PremierLeague-News.Com

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