Liverpool news Picturesque canal-side village a train ride from Liverpool PremierLeague-News.Com

PremierLeague-News.Com - "It's another pace of life out here. Life slows down"

Liverpool news Picturesque canal-side village a train ride from Liverpool PremierLeague-News.Com

PremierLeague-News.Com - "It's another pace of life out here. Life slows down"

Liverpool news  Picturesque canal-side village a train ride from Liverpool  PremierLeague-News.Com
03 July 2022 - 04:30

PremierLeague-News.Com - Breaking Sport Transfer News ! Only an hour’s train ride away from Liverpool lies Burscough, an idyllic canal-side village featuring a modern wharf filled with independent businesses. Burscough, which is just north of Ormskirk in West Lancashire, is both steeped in history and a rapidly changing place. With a population of around 10,000, Burscough’s stand-out feature is its position on the banks of the Leeds-Liverpool canal. Visitors can spend hours walking along the canal, which is home to many houseboats and offers highly-rated pubs – such as The Ship at Lathom – along its route. The busy A59 road runs through the centre of the village but, only a 100 yards away and down a couple of steps, the canal is peaceful. READ MORE: Merseyside's 'poshest' village that has one road in and out Michael Dawson, 53, is a local historian who was brought up in Burscough. He said: “It’s another pace of life out here. Life slows down. “It’s great on a summer’s day to see all the families out here enjoying themselves.” The canal opened in 1816 and has attracted visitors to the village for over 200 years. Councillor Chris Ryley, local historian Michael Dawson, and councillor Brian Bailey (Image: Eleanor Dye) Not to be missed is the village’s annual raft race down the canal. Starting at the slipway and ending at the Wharf, the race sees around 10 homemade rafts try to travel a mile down the river. Burscough Wharf, which backs onto the canal, was originally built in 1890 to house the horses that pulled the canal boats before they had engines. It became derelict but reopened in 2011 as a bustling retail and nightlife spot. Burscough Wharf is a reconverted horse stable (Image: Eleanor Dye) The wharf side features independent traders including bars, restaurants and the arts centre, which hosts comedy evenings and theatre and cinema showings. Michael said: “It used to be an eyesore but now it’s just another great part of the village.” Mandy Stewart is the company director and a sonographer at My Baby Scan, which looks over the Wharf. My Baby Scan offers scans from seven weeks until term and sees many locals and visitors from afar through its doors. Mandy, 59, has worked at My Baby Scan for five years. She said business on the Wharf is thriving, especially during evenings and at weekends. Mandy Stewart has worked at My Baby Scan for five years (Image: Eleanor Dye) The mum-of-two said: “The Wharf is the best it’s ever been. It’s grown a lot and it’s a lot more vibrant than it was ten years ago. It’s a friendly place and it’s one that suits all generations.” As Mandy pointed out, Burscough is a changing place. She said the village is a mixture of those who have lived there for a long time and newcomers attracted by housing developments. One of these is Yew Tree Farm, a 74-hectare site that will see 500 new homes by 2027. Brian Bailey, a town councillor who has lived in Burscough for 45 years, said: “The town is changing very quickly. I’d say around 2,000 more people have moved here in the past four years.” Visitors can enjoy walks along the canal (Image: Eleanor Dye) The increased population has seen the council grow from a parish to town council. Brian thinks the influx is also due to a survey by financial firm OneFamily in 2015, which said Burscough was one of the best places in the UK to bring up children in the UK. Ever since, people have flooded in – including many from Liverpool who have fancied a change from city to rural life. One thing that remains the same is the tight sense of community in the village. Michael said the people of Burscough are the best thing about village life. He told the ECHO: “There’s a great community spirit.

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. The people here are second to none.” At the heart of the community is Jen’s Sandwich Shop in the village centre. Jennifer Snow opened the popular shop almost three years ago and is in from 9am to 2pm from Monday to Friday, helped by her parents. Jennifer Snow works in the village every day (Image: Eleanor Dye) Jen, 50, is originally from Liverpool. She said: “It was the best move ever. I get such a homely feeling from here. “It’s like family and I would never move from Burscough now. People come in here just for a cup of tea and to pour their hearts out.” The sandwich shop was almost forced to shut during covid but Jen says business is now “going great”, especially since starting deliveries on JustEat. The popular lunch spot is usually full throughout its opening hours. Jen offers all sorts of sandwiches and knows the orders of her regular customers by heart. The mum-of-three checks up on her customers if they don’t come in and has recently started providing lunches for Burscough Bridge Methodist School. Jen's Sandwich Shop is located in the village centre (Image: Eleanor Dye) Burscough Football Club is a source of pride for many in the community. The team, which plays at Victoria Park, won the FA Trophy in 2003 – the smallest club in the country to ever do so. Brain said: “I couldn’t believe that a village this side could win it.” Burscough FC were the underdogs but came out top in the final against Tamworth. Efforts are being made to preserve the town’s history alongside the new developments. The town is steeped in military history – most obviously in its being the site of HMS Ringtail, a former WW2 naval air station built in 1942 used for fighter squadrons. Active service at the station ended in 1946 but the town has continued to acknowledge the former military site. A new Booths supermarket opened in 2015 on the former 650-acre airfield – uniquely designed in the shape of an aircraft hangar with a 1940s-style café. Burscough's Booths is in the shape of an aircraft hangar (Image: Michael Dawson) A monument was set up in 2004 to commemorate those who served at the airfield, while a ceremony is held every year on November 11. Another historic feature that has been modernised is Ainscough’s Mill. The stunning building, a former steam-powered corn mill dating from 1855, has been converted into flats but retains its original structure. The mill was closed in 1997 and lay derelict for 15 years before it was redeveloped. The mill looks over the village and you can see its chimney from almost any spot. Ainscough's Mill in 2015 (Image: Michael Dawson) You can see the old mill tower in the distance as you walk along the canal (Image: Eleanor Dye) Burscough is ideal for a day trip away to the countryside. With three train stations and excellent bus links, it is easy to reach from neighbouring cities. Parbold village is an hour and a half’s walk away up the canal, while Martin Mere wildlife centre is only an hour away. Martin Mere lake was the largest body of fresh water in England, dating back to the ice age, before it was drained in the 16th century. Today the wetland makes for a fun-filled family day out, offering a nature reserve, canoeing, pond-dipping and a cafe. The village enjoyed a spectacular turnout for its Jubilee celebrations at the start of June. The town was decorated with bunting and put on musical fireworks and hosted a duck race and a scarecrow competition. READ NEXT: 'Rules' of living in picture postcard Port Sunlight which many do not know Life in the tiny, picturesque village where 'everyone knows one another by sight' We visited the tucked away village where 'Morrisons didn't last two minutes' Reality of life on derelict TikTok housing estate Primrose Court Life in the Victorian village that people travel for miles to visit

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